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Piper

Piper
Copyright ©2005, Jeff Ulrich

Shot in DC at the Hillwood Estate.

Photographer: Jeff Ulrich
Folder: Oly E300 images
Uploaded: 2005-Mar-05 09:17 EST
Current Rating: 7.00/3 (Weighted rating: 7.57)
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Copying allowed: No
Camera: Olympus E-300
Lens: Sigma 55-200mm f4/5.6
Lens Adapter: None
ISO: 100
Aperture: f 4.5
Shutter Speed: 100
Focal Length: 69mm
Flash: No
Tripod/Monopod: No
Critique Level: Dead Honest Critique

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This is really good! The angle of the sun rays is just right, and the slightly overexposed parts give that third dimension to the picture. And the blurred background doesn't distract the viewer.

Once again, congratulations, very good photo!

Regards, Davor

Davor Cengija ¤ at 16:17 EST on 2005-Mar-05 [Reply]

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Davor Cengija has invitated to a discussion about taking pictures of other artistsí art (http://www.myfourthirds.com/document.php?id=8683), so I hope you donít mind that I do just that on your picture Jeff.

Apparently Rodin has said something like a sculpture is a painting from 999.000 angles. I think most of us agree that taking pictures of somebody elseís art and presenting it as our own is not the right thing to do (and a least in my country itís also illegal when it comes to paintings and also some sculptures if one donít have the permission of the artist and/or the owner). I also find it difficult to take pictures of sculptures and present those as my ďartĒ, but photos serve many purposes. Sometimes what one is commissioned to do is taking straight on pictures or details of sculptures and other art (mostly when those are going to be used in books about the art/artist, in exhibition catalogues, for postcards etc). I think such pictures can only be valued for technical and compositional qualities.

I think your picture of this sculpture borders on being a depiction (just a straight shot were you havenít add much of your own vision). You have chosen a part of the sculpture, but one can question if youíve seen something the original artist hasnít already seen/added something of your own. The boy/sculpture is nice, but that isnít really your merit. Your merit here is the angle youíve chosen, the composition (placing the sculpture in the left part of the picture, which works well I think) and the background youíve chosen. I think the background is too busy with all the large reflections (donít know what those are called in English Ė all those round circles). I think the highlights/sun on the sculptures face are quite nice, but not the highlights and shadows on the body and the flute.

So as I think you havenít really made this sculpture to be your own art I wonít give you much for emotional appeal, but I think itís fairly good when it comes to technical quality and composition.

p.t. Inactive Win ¤ $ at 17:10 EST on 2005-Mar-05 [Reply]

Wow - didn't know I was copying someone's art.

Maybe I shouldn't have posted - I'm really new to SLR's - this is my first and I was just posting an example of what the shot turned out like using the Sigma lens. This was a concrete yard statue - hardly someone's art that I'm claiming as my own.

Personally I liked the blurred background, I thought it added color and made the statue pop without distracting from it. There wasn't much in the background that would have been worthy of being in focus anyhow.

Guess I missed the point....

Jeff Ulrich at 22:09 EST on 2005-Mar-05 [Reply]

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Maybe I shouldn't have posted - I'm really new to SLR's - this is my first and I was just posting an example of what the shot turned out like using the Sigma lens. This was a concrete yard statue - hardly someone's art that I'm claiming as my own. I was walking through the Garden looking for something of interest to shoot - thus I composed the shot.

Personally I liked the blurred background, I thought it added color and made the statue pop without distracting from it. There wasn't much in the background that would have been worthy of being in focus anyhow.

Guess I missed the point....

Jeff Ulrich at 22:13 EST on 2005-Mar-05 [Reply]

I have a slightly different view

The first words in Gombrich's "The Story of Art" are "There really is no such thing as Art. There are only Artists". I interpret this to mean that anyoneís 'work' may be considered as Art by another. I won't repeat all he says at the beginning of his book but I think it is misguided to say that this statue is someone elseís art and therefore should not be photographed (I know that is not what Caroline is saying). I think that if that debate is carried to its logical conclusion then there may be little left to photograph. For example I have studied many architects and their work at the same time as looking at the work of famous painters. I have treated their buildings as art.

This image is not one I find pleasing. The extreme contrast on the pipes and hands is unsettling. The majority of the background is OK (The circles of light come from the Bokeh of the lens, which looks quite good) however there are some highlights that are distracting.

Rex Waygood HoF ¤1 $ at 02:24 EST on 2005-Mar-06 [Reply]

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Just to make the record straight; I think it's OK to take and post pictures like this one on MFT, but I think you would run into problems if you tried to sell the picture (if you didn't have the permission from the artist/maker and/or the owner). But I do find it difficult (impossible) to give it points/scores for emotional appeal as I don't think you've added enough of your own here. I also look upon architecture as someone elses' art. That doesn't prevent me from taking pictures of buildings, but I try to "make them my own" - sometimes I succeed, somtimes I don't. And I do post both types to get suggestions of what I could have done differently. Have a look at Ferd Berfle's pictures of modern buildings - I think he is good at "making them his own". :-)

p.t. Inactive Win ¤1 $ at 06:03 EST on 2005-Mar-06 [Reply]

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By the way - I think it's often difficult to make pictures of subjects like this in bright sunlight (because of the very light and often burnt out highligts one gets and dark/hard shadows). Somtimes it helps to underexpose, use a different WB setting (overcast temperatures instead of daylight temperatures for instance) or shoot from a different angle. And sometimes it's better to just wait for change of weather (or take the pictures early morning or late afternoon). :-)

p.t. Inactive Win ¤1 $ at 06:13 EST on 2005-Mar-06 [Reply]